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Artichoke Salad with Parmigiano-Reggiano Cheese Recipe

Artichoke Salad with Parmigiano-Reggiano Cheese Recipe

Artichoke Salad with Parmigiano-Reggiano Cheese Recipe

(insalata di carciofi con parmigiano-reggiano)

Preparation time : 20 minutes

Ingredients for 4 servings

  • artichokes 204/5 oz (600 g) about 4 medium
  • Parmigiano-Reggiano cheese, shaved 1 cup + 3 tbsp (120 g)
  • juice of 2 lemons
  • mint leaves, torn into pieces 4-5
  • extra-virgin olive oil, preferably Ligurian 3 tbsp + 2 tsp (50 ml)
  • salt and pepper to taste

Method :

  1. Clean the artichokes, removing the outer leaves and spines. Peel the stems and soak the artichokes in a mixture of water and lemon juice for 15 minutes. Grate or slice the Parmigiano into thin shavings.
  2. Combine 1-2 tablespoons lemon juice, the olive oil and a pinch of salt and pepper.
  3. Cut the artichokes in half, and if necessary remove the tough inner fibers. Slice them very thinly and dress them with the lemon and olive oil emulsion.
  4. Arrange the artichokes in the center of the plate. Top them with Parmigiano, hand-torn mint leaves and a drizzle of cold-pressed olive oil.

Artichokes

As Montaigne noted with great surprise in The Journal of Montaigne’s Travels in Italy from the late 16th century, the artichoke (Cynarascolymus) is often eaten raw in Italy. Likely derived from the wild cardoon, Italians’ extraordinary agricultural skills and incomparably inventive gastronomy led to the exceptional product that we know today. Once again, humans stubbornly wanted to modify nature, through a series of botanical grafting experiments, to fit their own tastes. The use of artichokes began to spread in the 16th century, and like all little known plants it was immediately assigned symbolic meanings and curious medical and scientific beliefs. For example, the artichoke’s reputation as a potent aphrodisiac may be why it was forbidden to young people from good families.