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Bavette Pasta with Swordfish and Cherry Tomatoes Recipe

Bavette Pasta with Swordfish and Cherry Tomatoes Recipe

Bavette Pasta with Swordfish and Cherry Tomatoes Recipe

(bavette con pesce spada e pomodorini)

Preparation time : 20 minutes + 10 minutes cooking time

Ingredients for 4 servings

  • bavette pasta (or substitute spaghetti) 101/2 oz (300 g)
  • swordfish, cut into 1/2– inch cubes 101/2 oz (300 g)
  • cherry tomatoes, halved 101/2 oz (300 g) about 18
  • extra-virgin olive oil 3 tbsp (40 ml)
  • garlic clove 1
  • wild fennel (fennel pollen) to taste
  • salt, pepper and hot red pepper to taste

Method :

  1. Heat 1 tablespoon + 2 teaspoon oil in a nonstick pan and sear the swordfish until browned. Season it with salt, pepper and wild  fennel to taste.
  2. Separately, sauté the whole garlic clove and hot red pepper in the remaining oil. Slice the tomatoes in half and add them. Season with salt to taste and let cook for a few minutes. Finally, add the fish.
  3. Boil the pasta in salted water and strain it when it’s al dente. Add it to the pan with the sauce and let everything cook together for a few seconds, mixing well, and serve.

Swordfish

Catching swordfish is a centuries-old ritual steeped in tradition. It’s a bona fide battle between fish and man, the latter armed with harpoons and out to capture one of the princes of the Mediterranean (Mediterranean swordfish reach a maximum length of 10 ft/ 3m and weigh up to 772 lbs/ 350 kg). During their mating season which is between June and August in the Mediterranean, swordfish begin a long migration toward the shore. This is when the fishermen take to the sea in specifically designed boats, ready for the hunt. A lookout, positioned in the crow’s nest, alerts the rest to any swordfish sightings. According to legend, the sound of the Italian language was said to scare off the fish, so Sicilian and Calabrian fisherman spoke only Greek while out at sea, using common, standardized phrases. Not only were they sure this language wouldn’t scare the fish, they believed that the ancient sounds would actually attract the fish, Difficulty almost magically.